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Social Change Photography

Archive for December 2009

Exhibition Opening at the FiftyCrows Gallery – International League of Conservation Photographers – First Thursday Event

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A Climate for Life

Images from the International League of Conservation Photographers

Exhibition Opening

WHEN: Thursday, January 7th
TIME: 5:00 to 7:30
WHERE: FiftyCrows Gallery
49 Geary St, Suite 225
San Francisco, CA 94108

©Frans Lanting

A Climate For Life focuses on the global challenge of climate change and suggests ways to dramatically reduce risks to human health, economic prosperity and the planet’s irreplaceable biological diversity.

A Climate for Life exhibition is a facet of the A Climate for Life campaign  and consists of 35 images from the International League of Conservation Photographers. Powerfully combining compelling images and essays into a beautiful volume, A Climate for Life is the result of leading scientists and veteran photographers contributing their talents to showcase the topics, issues, and challenges that society must urgently face. The A Climate for Life book creates a lasting impression that ultimately the responsibility to save the earth is literally and figuratively in our hands.

©Nick Nichols

The International League of Conservation Photographers is a consortium of some of the best photographers in the world working for conservation. A project-driven organization, ILCP’s mission is to translate conservation science into compelling visual messages targeted to specific audiences. We work with leading scientists, policy makers, government leaders and conservation groups to produce the highest-quality documentary images of both the beauty and wonder of the natural world and the challenges it faces.

Featured photographers from the iLCP include: Robert Glenn Ketchum, James Balog, Frans Lanting, Cristina Mittermeier, Daniel Beltra, Michele Westmoreland, and Nick Nickels. The list of publications, exhibitions and awards among these photographers include but are not limited to: National Geographic, World Press Photo, International Center of Photography (New York), the Centre Nationale de la Photographie (Paris) Leica Medal of Excellence, the California Academy of Science (San Francisco), the Ansel Adams Award for Conservation Photography, Outstanding Photographer of the Year from the North American Nature Photography Association, BC Wildlife Photographer of the Year, and the Sierra Club’s Ansel Adams Award.

©Daniel Beltra

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Written by Zara Katz

December 31, 2009 at 2:12 pm

Benedicte Kurzen – South African EVE Photographer

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kurzen

Benedicte Kurzen is a co-founder and member of Eve Photographers and part of the VII Mentor Program. Other projects she has been involved in include a video piece with Medecins Sans Frontieres (Doctors Without Borders) called Shattered Lives about victims of sexual violence and the physical and psychological services that are offered at MSF clinics. This Day of Change is an incredible collaboration project that involved the photographs from 132 photographers from around the world and their images from 1.20.09, the day the Barack Obama was became the president of the United States. Benedicte’s personal portfolios looks at politics, violence and culture in the Democratic Republic of the Congo as well as AIDS transmission between mother and child in South Africa.

Written by Zara Katz

December 24, 2009 at 11:49 am

FiftyCrows Gallery Hours – Closed for Christmas and New Years

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The FiftyCrows Gallery will be closed for Christmas and New Years from December 24 to January 6th.

The gallery will reopen on Thursday January 7th for First Thursday San Francisco Gallery Night. The next exhibition opening at FiftyCrows is from the International League of Conservation Photographers. Look out for a following post on the exhibition and book signing.

©David Doubilet

Written by Zara Katz

December 22, 2009 at 1:52 pm

FiftyCrows Fine Print Program – Bruce Davidson

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One of the most important components of FiftyCrows is the Fine Print Program, which is a major source of funding for the foundations initiatives. These limited-edition prints have been donated by 35 masters of photography, such as Eve Arnold, Hansel Mieth, and Jacques Lowe. Purchasing a print from the FiftyCrows Fine Print Program enables the foundation to cultivate the future of documentary photography by creating more exhibitions, lectures, and grants. All the prints can be viewed and purchased online at the FiftyCrows website. Please note that if you become a member of FiftyCrows for $35/year you can receive a $200-$1500 discount on photographs from the Fine Print Program. Contact FiftyCrows at info@fiftycrows.org if you are interested in membership or Fine Prints.

Body Builder in Venice, CA, Posing for a Woman with a "Brownie" Camera 1964 Gelatin silver print, 11 x 14 in, signed by the artist. Introduced as a Photo Fund Collector print in 1999 as edition of 100. Member price: $3250 Non-Member price: $4000

In the Fine Print Program, we have two images by Magnum photographer Bruce Davidson. Davidson was a major participant in documenting the American Civil Rights movement from 1961-1965. He has four books of images from New York City: Brooklyn Gang, East 100th St, Central Park, and Subway. His most recent book, Circus, looks at 3 American circuses and an Irish one-ring circus. At the moment, Davidson has two exhibitions in New York, Five Decades at Bryce Wolkowitz Gallery and East 100th St at Howard Greenberg Gallery.

Child on a Front Porch Playing with her Doll Baby, Shelby County, TN, 1962 Gelatin silver print, 11 x 14 in, signed by the artist. Introduced as a Photo Fund Collector print in 1999 as edition of 100. Member price: $3250 Non-Member price: $4000

Written by Zara Katz

December 21, 2009 at 10:38 am

Posted in Fine Print Program

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Photo Fund Winner Update: Stephaine Sinclair is selected for the Whitney Biennial 2010

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In 2004, FiftyCrows awarded Stephanie Sinclair one of her first photography grants. Last week, Stephanie was selected as one of four photographers for the 2010 Whitney Biennial. Next year’s biennial reflects the selected artists’ response to the hardships and joys of the past two years.

Known for her depiction of women’s issues and her ability to expose horrific situations, Sinclair’s 2004 International Fund for Documentary Photography photo essay was no exception. “Self-Immolation: Afghan Women Cry Out For Help” showed the women in the burn unit of the Herat Public Hospital. In the five subsequent years since winning the IFDP award, Sinclair’s work has continued to examine topics of women and war, establishing her as one of the most prominent photojournalists today.

Sinclair is currently working on a project that examines child brides in Afghanistan, South Asia, Ethiopia, Latin America and the United States. This work will be exhibited at the FiftyCrows Gallery in San Francisco in July of 2010. Sinclair’s deep interest in exposing women’s issues around the world led her to start Photobetty, a photography group that supports female photojournalist and female centered photo essays.

Sinclair worked for Corbis in Iraq and Lebanon and as a staff photographer for the Chicago Tribune. She has been published in The New York Times Magazine, US News and World Report, TIME, DoubleTake and Stern. Sinclair’s numerous honors include: CARE International Award for Humanitarian Reportage, a $15,000 Alexia Foundation grant and one of the W. Eugene Smith Grant in Humanistic Photography fellowships. Most recently in March 2009 Sinclair was asked to be full member of VIIphoto agency.

Other links to Stephanie Sinclair’s work:
Lightstalkers
PDN (video interview)

Written by Zara Katz

December 16, 2009 at 10:52 am

liveBooks RESOLVE Blog feature: Should photojournalists seek out the silver lining?

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FiftyCrows partner, liveBooks Inc. is the leading provider of custom photography website. This year they came out with a website deal that offers photojournalist/documentary photographer an affordable yet customized and professional way to have their images on the web. At FiftyCrows, we highly encourage photojournalist and documentary photographers to have a website as it enables their stories to be seen and told to anyone that has internet access.

The liveBooks blog, RESOLVE is “a collaborative online community that brings together photographers and creative professionals of every kind to find ways to keep photography relevant, respected, and profitable.” The editor of Resolve, Miki Johnson, writes and features posts about a variety of topics in the photography industry from new business models to traditional documentary projects. She strives to highlight how and why people are doing what they are doing in the photography world as well as the details and importance of the specific project they are working on. On the FiftyCrows blog I will feature Resolve posts about photojournalist and documentary photography related issues that provide insight on how photography continues to create social change.

Should photojournalist seek out the silver lining?

Posted by Miki Johnson
Considering that today is World AIDS Day, this seemed like the perfect time to highlight a new book from photographer Karen Ande, Face to Face: Children of the AIDS Crisis in Africa. Although hardly the first person to document this topic, Karen’s emphasis on telling positive stories is unusual. And her technique presents a hard — but important — question for documentary photographers: Do too many images of suffering make people feel helpless to improve things?
©Karen Ande

These three women are members of a granny support group that meets weekly to discuss issues and solve problems related to caring for their many young charges. ©Karen Ande

Miki Johnson: Tell me about the book you just released with Ruthann Richter, Face to Face: Children of the AIDS Crisis in Africa. What was the impetus of this project and what were you hoping to achieve with it?

Karen Ande: This book represents the culmination of seven years of work. The project began in 2002 when I was traveling in Kenya with my husband and friends. Our tour guide asked me if I’d like to visit an orphanage she had opened in the town of Naivasha and photograph the children, whose parents had died of AIDS.

I agreed to do it, thinking it would be a one-time visit that might result in a few shots she could use for fundraising. I did not realize that the children would charm me and that their survival hung in such a delicate balance. The orphanage ran out of rice the day I was there.

We left them with some money for food and I eventually went home and began to print the photographs. When I saw the images emerge in the developing tray I realized that I had an opportunity and a decision to make. I could choose to become involved in this issue or not. I chose to get involved, to reach out to nonprofits who were already supporting projects, to make multiple trips to document this issue. It has taken an enormous amount of time and personal finances, but I have never looked back.

©Karen Ande

Vannah is only 15 years old but is caring for five younger brothers and sisters after their parent's death from AIDS. ©Karen Ande

I am driven by this issue — 12 million children have been orphaned by AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa. There is little infrastructure to care for the children, but many local people whom I have met through NGO’s have creative viable projects that make a difference in these children’s lives. I hope this book will convince people to take a close look at the children I’ve met and begin to care enough to try to help them.

MJ: You’ve said that when you started photographing it was important to you to focus on the positive, things are getting better and people who are making a difference. Why was this so important to you?

KA: People do not hang around to be depressed. The media overexposes us to images of suffering I think, consistently giving us two messages: 1) there is really nothing one person can do to affect these overwhelming problems, and 2) money donated to Africa will be diverted by corrupt governments and aid agencies and never get to the people who need it.

In fact there is a great deal one person can do if they know how. If you donate to organizations working with in-country activists who know and understand their communities’ needs, the money is not wasted. In fact it is often the best way to help, as these projects are generally successful and sustainable. We list many NGO’s in our book that support these types of projects. Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Zara Katz

December 9, 2009 at 12:04 pm

Posted in AIDS, Disease, Health, RESOLVE Blog, Survival

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1st Thursday Gallery Night in San Francisco TONIGHT – 5 to 7:30pm – ART WOLFE’S TRAVELS TO THE EDGE

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Tonight is First Thursday Gallery opening night in San Francisco and the 49 Geary building will be packed with people coming to enjoy five floors of art galleries. Here on the second floor in suite 225, the FiftyCrows Gallery is showing Art Wolfe’s extraordinary images of wildlife, nature and people around the world. Art truly sees the magnificent beauty in the world which comes across in the focus, depth and color of his masterful images. The exhibition will be up at the FiftyCrows Gallery until the end of December.

WHEN:   Thursday December 3rd, 2009
5:00-7:30pm

WHERE:  FiftyCrows Gallery
49 Geary St – Suite 225
San Francisco, CA 94108

Written by fiftycrows

December 3, 2009 at 1:43 pm