FiftyCrows Blog

Social Change Photography

Posts Tagged ‘United States

Fine Print Program – Shelby Lee Adams

leave a comment »

One of the most important components of FiftyCrows is the Fine Print Program, which is a major source of funding for the foundations initiatives. These limited-edition prints have been donated by 35 masters of photography, such as Eve Arnold, Hansel Mieth, and Jacques Lowe. Purchasing a print from the FiftyCrows Fine Print Program enables the foundation to cultivate the future of documentary photography by creating more exhibitions, lectures, and grants. All the prints can be viewed and purchased online at the FiftyCrows website. Please note that if you become a member of FiftyCrows for $35/year you can receive a $200-$1500 discount on photographs from the Fine Print Program. Contact FiftyCrows at info@fiftycrows.org if you are interested in membership or Fine Prints.

Lincoln, Maw and Shorty, KY, 1992. Gelatin silver print, 9x12 1/16 in., signed by the artist, introduced as a Photo Fund Collector Print in 1999 as edition of 100. Market Price: $1000 Member Price: $700

For 25 years, Shelby Lee Adams has been documenting the people of Appalachia. His affectionate portraits of individuals and families speak to us with tenderness and sincerity, and the fact that Adams returns to the mountains year after year is a testament to his dedication to show their challenging existence while maintaining their dignity. Adams has received two NEA fellowships, and his work is also included in the collections of many major museums, including the Art Institute of Chicago, National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa; and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, among others. Adams’ photographs have been published in two volumes: Appalachian Portraits, 1993, and Appalachian Legacy, 1998.

Shelby Lee Adams blog

Advertisements

Written by Zara Katz

April 22, 2010 at 12:52 pm

Tony Deifell: Seeing Beyond Sight – Photographs by Blind Teenagers

leave a comment »

katymed

Taken by Katy, age 13

With its ambitious, seemingly paradoxical premise,
Seeing Beyond Sight challenges our definitions of art,
vision, and perception and what it really means “to see.”

Visual artist and social entrepreneur, Tony Deifell works with blind teenagers to teach them photography. While it may seem important to have sight in order to photograph, Deifell’s book Seeing Beyond Sight proves that photography is about a vision. In December, Deifell spoke at Google about his book and described how the project opened his consciousness to perceiving the possibilities in the world.

antoniomedmelodymedtraceymed

Tony Deifell writes about the book:

Seeing Beyond Sight is about seeing in the broadest sense. I use the physical behavior of light as a metaphor for the book’s five chapters: Distortion, Refraction, Reflection, Transparence & Illuminance. Light is what makes it possible for the eye to see – and to make photographs – but we don’t usually see light itself.

I thought of these five chapters as a journey towards light – towards an illuminance that is beyond everyone’s eyesight – although the source of light is not fully known. The road is already dark enough as we wade through distortions and refractions to explore ourselves and our relationship with the world.

Ultimately, we may catch only a glimmer of a picture larger than us – an image of the world that is just beyond our full grasp.

Here is a video of Tony speaking at Google about teaching photography to blind teenagers and in return what they taught him about seeing the world. (Note: don’t shy away from watching because of the length, it is work every second especially the video clip of his student Cassie talking about her love of Italian):



Written by Zara Katz

July 29, 2009 at 3:56 pm

Posted in Blind Photography, Youth

Tagged with

The Burden of Memory: John Trotter and Donna DeCesare

with 2 comments


DECESARE05.web

“The camera relieves us of the burden of memory. It surveys us like god.”

-John Berger

Donna DeCesare, winner of the 1999 International Fund for Documentary Photography, has focused her work on and the effects of violence, gang culture, war, and trauma on youth. Her IFDP winning photo essay, titled: Shadow Dreams and New Youth Visions, explored the intersecting worlds of gangs in Los Angeles and El Salvador where young adults experience the some of the highest rates of homicide. Some of her other projects include, Sharing Secrets: Children’s Portraits Exposing Stigma, Crimes of War and Edgar’s Story.

As the Dart Media Curator and the Latin America Coordinator for the Dart Center for Journalism and Trauma, DeCesare recently produced a multimedia piece with photographer John Trotter about his personal experience with violence. While photographing for the Sacramento Bee, Trotter was attacked and suffered a severe brain injury that took months to recover from. As a way to process his trauma, Trotter took images of other patients at the rehab center, which DeCesare combined with her interview of Trotter speaking about his emotions. The effect: compassion into Trotters trauma and admiration for his exceptionally sad and haunting images.

burden_of_memory Please click here to watch the video interview: http://dartcenter.org/gallery/burden-memory

The video was made by the Dart Center for Journalism and Trauma, John Trotter, Donna DeCesare and Joey Castillo. The Dart Center for Journalism and Trauma, a project of the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism, is dedicated to informed, innovative and ethical news reporting on violence, conflict and tragedy. The John Trotter piece is part of Dart Media, a gallery of visual storytelling, highlighting exemplary work that advances the conversation about how to witness, interpret and represent violence and suffering.

http://dartcenter.org/

Written by Zara Katz

July 23, 2009 at 3:32 pm